There Are No Shortcuts to Growth

R.C. Sproul: I’m still amazed whenever I see the bumper sticker that reads, “Visualize world peace.” The idea is that if I, and enough other people, create the right mental picture of peace, it will soon come to pass. It’s astounding that some people actually believe that silly technique will bring about such a desirable goal. Then, there’s the popular “Coexist” bumper sticker. You may have seen it, the one spelled out with the symbols of different religions—the Islamic crescent forming the C, the Christian cross forming the T, and so on. The idea seems to be that if we religious people would just stop focusing on our differences, we could achieve world harmony. If we understood that our beliefs are all ultimately the same, all of the problems of war and strife would go away. The funny thing is, we’ll reject such sentiments when they appear on a bumper sticker, but we’ll accept them elsewhere. How many business seminars promise increased

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Why we grow so slowly

Ray Ortlund: In his Thoughts on Religious Experience, Archibald Alexander asked why we grow so slowly as Christians. First, he rounded up the usual suspects: “The influence of worldly relatives and companions, embarking too deeply in business, devoting too much time to amusements, immoderate attachment to a worldly object,” and so forth. But then he drilled down further and asked why such things even get a hold on us, “why Christians commonly are of so diminutive a stature and of such feeble strength in their religion.” He proposed three reasons: 1.  “There is a defect in our belief in the freeness of divine grace.” Even when the gospel is acknowledged in theory, he wrote, Christians define their okayness according to their moods and performances rather than looking away from themselves to Christ alone. Then, in our inevitable failure, we become discouraged, and worldliness regains strength in us, with nothing to counteract it. “The covenant of grace must be more clearly

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My Sanctification In Redemptive History

Tony Reinke: Even if we take personal holiness seriously as believers (and we should), we often lose sight of how our personal sanctification fits into a much larger redemptive storyline that stretches all the way back to creation and stretches forward into eternity. One of the strengths of Kevin’s new book The Hole In Our Holiness is a focus on this storyline (see pages 38–47). I asked him to summarize it, and explain why it matters, in the following clip (6 minutes):   Here’s a full list of clips from our 7-part interview series with Kevin DeYoung on The Hole In Our Holiness — What’s the Hole in Our Holiness? My Sanctification in Redemptive History The Imitation of Christ The Most Neglected Theme in Sanctification The Many Motivators For Personal Holiness Extraordinary Holiness Through Four Ordinary Means How Far Is Too Far Before Marriage?